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WETA 4
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WETA
Apr 18, 2010 10:00am EDT
is not an option for the united states of america. >> i think the idea of gateway journalism, of big networks and big newspapers being the only voices on the landscape, is over. >> this idea of what is credible ultimately comes down to who do you trust. who has been trustworthy? >> from the knight studios at the newseum in washington, d.c., i'm frank sesno. hello, and welcome to "the future of news," our conversation about old and new media and what it means for news and for all of us in the digital age. i'm happy to be joined today by 2 award-winning journalists in the world of international reporting. ann curry of nbc news may be best known for her work on the "today" show and "dateline," but she's also distinguished herself in global humanitarian reporting. she reported on the crisis in darfur when few western reporters were there and has returned to africa repeatedly to cover the conflicts in sudan, chad, and the congo. she's also reported from the middle east and from iran for that country's presidential election. charles sennott, longtime foreign correspondent for the "boston globe," wa
WETA
Apr 11, 2010 10:00am EDT
>> this program is brought to you by a grant from the... >> when news breaks, america turns on the television. for 50 years, tv news has delivered the big stories and raked in big profits. television still owns live news, but ratings have been falling for decades, and the web has changed everything. did tv news react in time? >> they didn't say, "oh, my god. this is a 5-alarm fire that's gonna transform and destruct our business. what do we do?" >> there are 25 billion video streams a month on the internet, and it's not just piano-playing cats anymore. is news on the old tube in trouble with youtube? that's our topic today on "the future of news." >> a government without a tough and vibrant media of all sorts is not an option for the united states of america. >> you know, on youtube, we liked to say that everyone is now a reporter, but everyone is not a journalist. >> curious people have a lot of choices, and we just need to be one of their choices. >> from the newseum in washington, d.c., this is "the future of news." welcome to the knight studio and our conversation about
WETA
Apr 25, 2010 10:00am EDT
for the united states of america. >> presidents have gotten better and better at stymieing an ability to get at what's really going on. >> we're in the middle of a massive transformation of journalism, and it's just beginning now. >> this is "the future of news" from the knight studios at the newseum in washington d.c. i'm frank sesno. welcome to our conversation about news in the digital age. i'm joined today by two of washington's most accomplished political reporters. sam donaldson is a broadcasting icon and veteran reporter for abc news. he was chief white house correspondent covering 3 presidents, and for more than 40 years at abc, he's reported the biggest national political stories of our time. in addition to anchoring abc's "primetime live" and "this week" programs, sam's an internet pioneer. he was host of abc's first web-only program, "sam donaldson@abcnews.com." and jim vandenhei made his mark as a national political reporter for "the wall street journal" and then "the washington post." he left that paper in 2006 with john harris to create politico, a web site and newspaper that's
WETA
Apr 4, 2010 10:00am EDT
media of all sorts is not an option for the united states of america. >> obviously, they want more opinion. look what they watch. look what they're watching at night. they're watching "o'reilly." they're watching glenn beck. >> how do we deliver the news that people need to conduct their daily lives, to be good citizens? >> from the newseum in washington, d.c., this is "the future of news." welcome to the night studio and our conversation about media and news in the digital age. i'm sonya gavankar filling in for frank sesno. today's guests have very different perspectives on the news media. chris matthews is a long-time broadcast journalist, a best-selling author, and of course is host of "hardball" on msnbc. jan schaffer is a print journalist and a pulitzer prize winner. she is now at the american university as the executive director of the j-lab, the institute of interactive journalism. welcome to you both. let's start out with a very quick question: is there really anything wrong with 24-hour news cycle? jan? >> well, it doesn't serve all the citizens. in a democracy, people nee
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4